Review: TouchMath Kindergarten Curriculum

ByAngie

Review: TouchMath Kindergarten Curriculum

Until recently, we had not used a formal curriculum for math. Sure, we did math, but it was a compilation of basic skills, free worksheets that I had found online, games, flash cards, manipulatives, art, and workbooks that I had put together. So, when we were offered the chance to review the Kindergarten Homeschool Curriculum from  TouchMath  right at the beginning of our Kindergarten year, (We began in January.) I was relieved. Not that I don’t know Kindergarten math, mind you, (Though some might say I don’t. 😉 ) I just felt it was time to begin using some “real” curricula and to be honest, when it came to math, I wasn’t sure where to turn.

I usually get excited for curriculum shopping. However, I wasn’t really liking what I saw in the math department. Up pops this opportunity, and what do you know? It was an answer to prayer.

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TouchMath uses a very tactile approach by utilizing TouchPoints. With this approach, every number has points. Each point has a value of one and is assigned a place on the number. When counting the numbers, the child touches the points and says them aloud, adding up the value of the numeral. The “year” is broken up into units (A-D) and then into 6 modules. The manual is probably the best one I’ve ever seen, actually walking you through each and every step of the worksheets/activities by telling you when to let the child work alone and when to guide them. Forms for monitoring progress or to take notes on what to go back and review more of are also included, along with detailed explanations of what your child should be doing and is expected to know before beginning the module and after.

If you have a child that needs to learn kinesthetically or has sensory issues, this might be something you really want to look into. Tommy has to literally exhaust every one of his 5 senses some days when it comes to math. (Okay, maybe not ALL of them. If I could have him eat the numbers to taste them, and it would work, I would. He’s just a typical 5 year old boy who doesn’t understand the point of all this number talk. On good days, he catches on almost too fast! Oh, I’m rambling… Sorry…)

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For our review, we were also given TouchShapes, TouchMath Tutor Software, and 3-D Numerals. These items are NOT required, and the curriculum standing alone is still good. However, I found that by combining all of these resources together with the core curriculum, that is based on common core state standards, Tommy was able to touch, say, and hear what he was learning.  Sometimes just moving a TouchShape to a different place on the worksheet or hearing the bear on the software explain a concept to him, he was able to grasp what he was trying to understand. The 3-D Numerals I would highly recommend should you choose to go with this program, though, as they are really what helped Tommy “get it” more than anything. (And while we were not given TouchMath to review for our preschool aged son, Johnny Ben, who is Autistic, I want to mention something: After watching his older brother do his lessons, Johnny Ben walked over to the table in the homeschool room and began touching the TouchPoints on the 3-D Numerals and saying the numbers. (He is mostly non-verbal.) Color me happy!)

The lessons are to last about 2 1/2 times your child’s age, so since Tommy just turned 5 this last week we focused on 10-12 minutes of lessons 4-5 days a week. Some days this meant we only got through 1 (a few times less) worksheet or activity. Other days it meant we did 3 worksheets or he flew through the lessons on the software. In the beginning this worried me, but after a few weeks I realized it was working out for him when he was counting to 100 at a family dinner with my parents and showing such confidence about it. At this point in time he is learning subtraction and is just going with the flow.

A quick example of Tommy using the software.

A quick example of Tommy using the software.

The TouchMath Kindergarten Homeschool curriculum is available as a download from TouchMath.com. Now, this is another really cool thing I like about this company. You don’t have to buy the entire year at once. If you want to, you can, but if you would like to you can buy only one unit at a time. The cost of each unit individually is $59.95, and if you purchase all 4 units at once the price is $199.95. The optional add-ons that our family was given to review were:

  • TouchShapes – $30.00
  • 3-D Numerals (That also comes with a fun CD-Rom loaded with worksheets. Tommy LOVED these worksheets!) – $79.00
  • TouchMath Tutor Kindergarten Software – $99.00
  • (There are also other items available for sale that supplement this curriculum on their website. These are just the items we were given to review.)

All in all, I give TouchMath a good rating. Teaching math to some kids is just flat out hard. Especially a child who could care less about it. It got my son’s attention and has him learning things he needs to know. A+!

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Want to know more? Feel free to click here to see other reviews, including those of families who were given different grade levels. Thanks for stopping by!

 

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About the author

Angie editor

Angie, a mother of 5, currently lives in the Inland Empire area of Southern California with her husband of 19 years, Bobby, & 4 of their children. She is a non-custodial mother of 1 that lives with her during the Summer. Angie is a stay at home mom, homeschooling all 3 of her younger children. (She plans to homeschool her children through high school graduation.) She’ll be the first to admit she is human & full of flaws. Every day she praises God for His grace & mercy on her life. She’s lived in 5 different states, loves to craft & sew, and is what you would call a “Disney Geek” since birth. Dreaming of one day returning to school, her free time is spent studying and attempting to play piano. If you have any questions or for any other reason need to contact someone about this blog, she is the one to contact. You can email her at Angie (at) RaisingStickyHands (dot) com.